BROCHEL

10 IX 1773
9 VIII 2013

BROCHEL



Scotland is full of castles in ruins, poor castles in the Highlands of Scotland, and as opposed to the castles of the Rhine, which suggest an opulent life with small but more or less lavish courts, these don’t, they give the impression of a life of battle, of difficult battles…” (Borges)


Anatomy of the Ruins of Raasay


MORE OR LESS
ENTIRE

ruin



THE APPRECIATION
OF DEPRECIATION

ruin



Old Malcolm Macleod walked Boswell this far, and back home again, and they’d still the puff to dance all night.

The castle is more ruined now (even the old DANGER sign is a ruin), but it still has the odd appearance of “a concretion of pebbles and earth.”

We turned our back on the bulwark of history and exercised ourselves on the pebble beach, one writing down notes, the other grading pebbles by their colours, both gathering thoughts.

The sky had that especial Hebridean quality of many backlit greys, the cloud a hem on the cliffs of Screapadal. It wasn’t raining, but it wasn’t not.


HORATIAN SOLITUDE

idyll


OVIDIAN SOLITUDE

exile


Highet’s book was still on our mind – all those exiles served by the Latin poets. He invites the reader to imagine Catullus’ spell of Government service in Bithynia, as if “Lord Byron served as Assistant Principal for The Highways and Rivers Bureau of a small province in India”. Why not a stint as temporary surveyor on Callum’s Road?



Bibliography

Jorge Luis Borges et al, Professor Borges: A Course on English Literature (2013)
Gilbert Highet, Poets in a Landscape (1957)
Rodger Hutchinson, Calum’s Road (2008)